Le M.U.R. laced with paper cut by Rubbish

Rubbish Cube’s delicate hand cut paper lace artworks, each requiring many hours to produce, are recognisable on walls around Paris, especially Rue Amelot in the 11th arrondissement. The lightness and fragility of his street art, requiring an impressive technical mastery, now have a two week legal outdoors showing, courtesy of the impresarios at Le M.U.R..

Quickly, for those unfamiliar with Le M.U.R., it’s a project which revolves around a three by eight metre billboard set aside by the city council for the purpose of promoting street art.

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2012 http://charliestine.net

Rubbish’s street art. Copyright 2012 charliestine.net

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 True Duke http://www.facebook.com/duketrue

Rubbish approaches his working space.  Photo: Copyright 2013 True Duke

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 True Duke http://www.facebook.com/duketrue

The previous iteration of Le M.U.R. by Da Cruz covered by Rubbish (tee hee!). Photo: Copyright 2013 True Duke 

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 True Duke http://www.facebook.com/duketrue

 Photo: Copyright 2013 True Duke

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 Laurence Pierrain-Mateudi http://www.facebook.com/laurence.pierrainmateudi

President of Le M.U.R., Bob Jeudy (left) with Rubbish (right). Co-founder and Secretry of Le M.U.R., Thomas Schmitt, in the background giving the artist a helping hand. Copyright 2013 Laurence Pierrain-Mateudi 

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 Laurence Pierrain-Mateudi http://www.facebook.com/laurence.pierrainmateudi

  Community of dedicated Parisian urban art enthusiasts look on at the live artwork performance. Copyright 2013 Laurence Pierrain-Mateudi 

Street artist, Rubbish Cube (or his preferred name, Rubbish), a 32 year-old, self-taught artist who lives and works in Besançon in the east of France, creates delicate collages – reminiscent of female American street artist Swoon - which create a slender poetry in paradoxical symbiosis with the stone built Parisian urban space are mostly large portraits in black and white, often with a emotionally intense piercing gaze.

Rubbish, who takes his name from his former band, Dirty Rubbish, showed last year at Le Cabinet d’Amateur gallery in a group show, alongside Fred le Chevalier, Diamant, Gzup, Arnaud Boisramé, Miss.Tic, Paella and Tristan de Limbes, among others.

Ordinarily, pasted up on walls in Paris, evolving and eventually disappearing at the rate of the weather and the activity of the city, recurring motifs in his work, include the hand of the ‘Inquisitor’, or the ‘Heart of the City’. This interaction between the work of the artist and the vitality of the urban space, cause rise to fierce beauty, and the expression of an aesthetic accessible to all.

Rubbish Cube qualifies urban art perfectly as an ephemeral gesture of the values of libertarianism and humanism. Rubbish Cube inspired by Native American culture, myths and legends, or figures from the Beat Generation, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, uses colour rarely.

Made with incredible technical precision the poetic emotion that emanates from his delicate paper lace convey infinite patterns. By following the path of these fine carvings the viewer can be roused into a state of deep contemplation.

Rubbish admits being influenced by American street artist, Swoon, who also uses intricate cut lace paper collages, which she pastes up in New York’s Brooklyn neighbourhood, and further afield, but Rubbish’s work is a very different artistic style. Rubbish says he tends not to be influenced by street art, but rather pop surrealism and Lowbrow art, such as the art of Todd Schorr.

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 True Duke http://www.facebook.com/duketrue

 Photo: Copyright 2013 True Duke

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 Laurence Pierrain-Mateudi http://www.facebook.com/laurence.pierrainmateudi

  Copyright 2013 Laurence Pierrain-Mateudi 

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 Laurence Pierrain-Mateudi http://www.facebook.com/laurence.pierrainmateudi

  Copyright 2013 Laurence Pierrain-Mateudi 

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2012 http://charliestine.net

 Copyright 2012 charliestine.net

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 True Duke http://www.facebook.com/duketrue

 Photo: Copyright 2013 True Duke

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 True Duke http://www.facebook.com/duketrue

 Photo: Copyright 2013 True Duke

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art - Copyright 2013 True Duke http://www.facebook.com/duketrue

Photo: Copyright 2013 True Duke

Le M.U.R. - Rubbish Cube - Paris street art

Visit Rubbish’s website, at rubbish-cube.blogspot.fr

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Le M.U.R. can be visited twenty four hours a day, 365 days a year at the following address:

107 Rue Oberkampf

75011 Paris

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The post draws on articles and interviews at the following websites:

mcwp.net

parisianshoegals.blogspot.fr

streetlove.fr

 

Gay marriage and ‘democracy on the walls of the city’

Gay marriage and street art joined hands over the weekend thanks to French street-artist, Kashink, who produced a phenomenal mural at the Canal St Martin in support of proposed new equality laws.

Meanwhile, yesterday, up  to 150,000 marched on the Bastille in support of legalising marriage and adoption for same-sex couples, in advance of the new liberalisation measures proposed by President Francois Hollande’s new Socialist government, to be decided upon by the French National Assembly on the 29th January.

Alternative Paris, Contributing Editor, Fernanda Hinke, met Kashink and interviewed her on gay marriage and street art, while Richard Beban, photographer and co-editor of the online journal, Paris Play, captured the demonstration.

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Paris, yesterday, saw more than 60,000 protesters marching in support of gay marriage and the right to adopt children by couples of the same gender.  This heated discussion will go to the Assemblée nationale (French Parliament) in January, and with the new legislation facing strong opposition from right-wing politicians and France’s powerful religious factions, it’s not certain whether the proposals will be enacted or not.

Rather than sit and wait to see what our so-called leaders decide, however, Kashink has taken things into her own hands, and used the power of the spray can to shout out what many people are taking too long to recognise. I find it fantastic that street art can put the cards on the table and open up dialogue on this debate in such a way. I call it, ‘democracy, on the walls of the city’!

- Fernanda Hinke, Contributing Editor

Gay marriage France - Paris street artist Kashink mural at Canal Saint-Martin. Photo: Fernanda Hinke (1)

 

Gay marriage France - Paris street artist Kashink mural at Canal Saint-Martin. Photo: Fernanda Hinke (2)

 

Gay marriage France - Paris street artist Kashink mural at Canal Saint-Martin. Photo: Fernanda Hinke (5)

 

Gay marriage France - Paris street artist Kashink mural at Canal Saint-Martin. Photo: Fernanda Hinke (3)

 

Gay marriage France - Paris street artist Kashink mural at Canal Saint-Martin. Photo: Fernanda Hinke (4)

What is your intention by painting this mural on gay marriage?

I’ve already painted gay characters before, and this time I thought it could be a fun idea to paint a very big wall about gay marriage, since it’s been a very hot topic in France lately.

I had noticed this wall before, because of its size (6 x 15 m, around 20 x 50 ft.) and visibility. Some other guys had painted the whole thing before and it’s pretty challenging.  French President, François Hollande, during his election campaign, promised he would legalise gay marriage. Then when it was time to take a decision, he chickened out.  Then people started protesting against gay marriage. I was horrified to see how the hate and violence started to spread, so I felt it was neccesary to make a gesture in support of these equality measures

France is at the forefront of the street art movement, while at the same time it is behind several countries in terms of same-gender marriage. What is your opinion about this?

France can be old school sometimes, especially when it comes to issues involving religion. Our country is supposed to be all about secularism, and while Spain is a lot more catholic than we are, gay marriage has been legal there for seven years. Also, street art hasn’t always been well accepted here either, but this has changed in the past four years or so. Now everybody is starting to become interested.

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (10)

Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

How do you think street art can help change society’s values?

As a street artist, I always try to put a message in what I do. Maybe some people will relate to it, some maybe not, you never know.  What I know, however, is that street-art is partly rooted in protest (anarcho-punk stencils, etc.), and I like the idea of keeping it that way.  The characters I paint are very colorful and sometimes they look like they could be coming out of a children’s book. So I guess it’s easier because the whole thing looks fun.

For this particular piece, I wanted to create an emphasise on romance. These two characters look happy, but they’re also a little shy. I wanted them to be cute.  Most people that passed by or watched me paint responded very well to the message.  I really hope that soon legalised gay marriage will be as accepted as women’s right to vote.

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (4)

 Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

Did you have the intention of linking this painting with the demonstration this Sunday in Paris?

Yes, I started working on it on Wednesday, came back on Thurdsday, and finished it Saturday. It was a real challenge for me to make it on time, because I knew that the protest was on Sunday.  The wall wasn’t on the protesters’ route but it was my contribution. I heard there was more than 50, 000 people demonstrating this afternoon, I really hope our government will have the balls to keep their promises.

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (9)

 Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (21)

 Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (2)

 Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (6)

 Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (5)

 Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (20)

 Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

Gay marriage demo Paris. Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012 (16)

 Photo: Richard Beban and Paris Play copyright 2012

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Alternative Paris.

SMOLE makes Le M.U.R. & Gerard Zlotykamien show ends

French graffiti artist, SMOLE, working at Le M.U.R. last Thursday was an extremely pleasant way to witter away a part of the afternoon.

Heartily committed to the cause of this open-sky museum, come rain or shine, but this time relaxing in the sunshine on the terrace at the Cafe Place Verte, team Le M.U.R. watched on as SMOLE sprayed his way to become one of the more than 120 artists to have made Le M.U.R., which revolves around a former advertising billboard set aside by the city council for the purpose of promoting street art, since its inauguration in 2007.

SMOLE comes from Montpellier in the south of France and for the past 15 years has worked in the tradition of New York graffiti, an an avid painter of rolling stock, even serving time in prison for his favoured medium of artistic expression.

Le MUR painted by French graffiti artist SMOLE - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (5)

Le MUR painted by French graffiti artist SMOLE - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (6)

Le MUR painted by French graffiti artist SMOLE - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (1)

Meanwhile, as the sunshine pierced through plumes of spraypaint fumes emanating from SMOLE’s three by eight metre letters  being painted at the Parisian art project seventy-five year old street artist, Gerard Zlotykamien’s indoors exhibition organised by Galerie Mathgoth across the road on rue St Maur, wound down.

Le MUR painted by French graffiti artist SMOLE - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (2)

Le MUR painted by French graffiti artist SMOLE - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (3)

Zlotykamien began painting in 1955 and met Yves Klein. His first street intervention dates from 1963. His drawings he believes evoke human shadows of the kind that were printed onto the walls after the Hiroshima explosion.

Gerard Zlotykamien inagurates Le MUR - 105 rue Oberkampf, 75011, Paris. Photo: Le MUR

 Le M.U.R. #1 made by Gerard Zlotykamien in 2007 at 105 rue Oberkampf. Photo: l’association Le M.U.R

Kashink paints Le M.U.R. and the Parisian autumn starts

Women being rare in the street art world, yesterday, and the beginning of my first Parisian autumn, to mark the occasion I went to Le M.U.R. (Association Le Modulable Urbain Reactif) - the Parisian art project which revolves around a three by eight metre billboard set aside by the city council for the purpose of promoting street art -  to see French street artist Kashink’s performance.

Kashink Le M.U.R. urban art, Paris - Oberkampf - Alternative Paris. Photo: Fernanda Schweichler (3)

Kashink Le M.U.R. urban art, Paris - Oberkampf - Alternative Paris. Photo: Fernanda Schweichler (9)

Wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with the work of Jean-Michel-Basquiat and a faux moustache above her delicate lips, Kashink distributed sincere smiles to an appreciative audience gathered at the wall in Paris 11th arrondissement, who watched her hands sliding around holding spray cans, drawing with sweet colours her unmistakable characters.

Kashink paints huge protean figures with multiple eyes, men mostly, or Mexican skulls, all in a colourful graphic style, away from traditional references to female graffiti. Inspired by Frida Kahlo and the “Bad Painting” of Basquiat and Keith Haring, among the themes that are usual to her, these include taboo subjects, such as homosexuality, the status of women, and death.

The number thirteen can be seen in her Le M.U.R., representing the character’s third eye, and is also Kashink’s lucky number, she explained me. Also seen is the phrase, “Okay Mom I will”, which relates to a mum’s concerns with her son and his response being boring, but positive.  What she really likes is for people to look at her drawings and feel stimulated to create their own meanings.

Kashink Le M.U.R. urban art, Paris - Oberkampf - Alternative Paris. Photo: Fernanda Schweichler (8)

Kashink Le M.U.R. urban art, Paris - Oberkampf - Alternative Paris. Photo: Fernanda Schweichler (6)

Kashink Le M.U.R. urban art, Paris - Oberkampf - Alternative Paris. Photo: Fernanda Schweichler (2)

Le M.U.R. is always a good place to meet friends, special people, and to exchange ideas with other lovers of urban art. I guess Kashink painted the huge six by four metre panel in around eight hours, of which I enjoyed three hours, yesterday. However, after being chilled by the cold sensation of the autumn air, sadly, I left before she finished the work, but then I came back this morning to take pictures of the work.

Kashink Le M.U.R. urban art, Paris - Oberkampf - Alternative Paris. Photo: Fernanda Schweichler (5)

Kashink Le M.U.R. urban art, Paris - Oberkampf - Alternative Paris. Photo: Fernanda Schweichler (7)

Thanks to a beautiful surprise from the Universe this morning! While writing this article beside Le M.U.R. at the Café Charbon I met Kashink still working on her painting that was supposed to be finished yesterday. I had the pleasure to talk with her again and receive her explanation of the work. I asked her to sign my bike and as always, smiling, she gave me this beautiful gift. Thirteen thanks for the beautiful performance of Kashink!

Kashink Le M.U.R. urban art, Paris - Oberkampf - Alternative Paris. Photo: Fernanda Schweichler (10)

Paris graffiti Mecca on the Canal l’Ourcq

Paris Graffiti artists of the PoDaMa collective paint the Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Paris à Pantin on the Canal l'Ourcq for l’ete-du-canal - Alternative Paris. Photos: Demian Smith (15) (22)

Along the Canal l’Ourcq at the north-east Paris suburb of Pantin stands a shrine to local Paris graffiti artists Artof Popof, Da Cruz and Marko and their guests, who have painted completely the exterior of two gigantic old warehouses.

As part of this year’s L’été du Canal (“Summer Canal” event) the town hall of Paris suburb Pantin gave carte blanche to the graffiti artists to paint these former Chamber of Commerce and Industry buildings, built in 1929 to receive grain and flour.

The industrial era is over and the use of the buildings is currently under reclassification. The buildings will eventually be rehabilitated to house economic activities. And so takes place the reconquest of the banks of the canal!

Paris Graffiti artists of the PoDaMa collective paint the Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Paris à Pantin on the Canal l'Ourcq for l’ete-du-canal - Alternative Paris. Photos: Demian Smith (15) (2)

The warehouses of the old Chambre de Commerce et d’Industrie de Paris at Pantin, located at Rue Ernest Renan 93500, Pantin Continue reading

Sten & Lex hit Le M.U.R. with a stencil poster

Sten-Lex-Le-MUR-Paris-11e-Arrondissement-Paris street art - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian-Smith

Sten & Lex, the Roman street art duo, were in Paris this weekend accepting the invitation offered to them to make Le M.U.R., the Parisian art project which revolves around a three by eight metre billboard set aside by the city council for the purpose of promoting street art. Continue reading

Jace paints Le M.U.R. criticising the street art market

French street artist Jace has been given reign over Le M.U.R., the  project revolving around a three by eight metre billboard, set aside by the Marie de Paris for the purpose of promoting urban art.

The artist has been doing graffiti since 1989 and is famous for painting his character, Gouzou, which can be found all around the tropical island, French protectorate, Réunion Island.

Jace’s Gouzou are often placed in absurd, funny situations and you will find them all over the world including in Madagascar, Mauritius, and Bali, and now on Le Mur, at 105 rue Oberkampf, on the corner of rue Saint-Maur in the 11th Arrondissement.

The character was recently copied by a large Chinese brand to promote its products. Luckily, and, perhaps, amazingly, the Chinese courts ruled in favour of Jace, and is now a  jurisprudence case for author’s rights in China.

Jace and his Gouzou can be seen in the streets of Paris if you look carefully. If you are unable to search the streets in search of them, however, you could just go and visit an indoors exhibition of his work which opens this Saturday at Galerie Mathgoth:

Jace, 20 Piges at Galerie Mathgoth

Opening in the presence of the artist on Saturday, June 9th at 6pm.

The show will be open to the public Tuesday to Saturday, 2 – 7pm, until June 21st.

103, rue Saint-Maur – 75011 Paris

Jace - street art in Paris - Gouzou's at Le M.U.R. - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (1) (4)

Jace - street art in Paris - Gouzou's at Le M.U.R. - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (1) (1)

Jace - street art in Paris - Gouzou's at Le M.U.R. - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (1) (3)

Jace - street art in Paris - Gouzou's at Le M.U.R. - Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (1) (2)

Stolen VHILS Le M.U.R. is replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (6)

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (8)

Last night, French street artist Le MoDuLe De ZeeR hit ‘Le M.U.R.’ (Association Modulable, Urbain, Réactif), after the authorised work by Portuguese street artist Vhils was stolen earlier in the week.

The work of VHILS was taken on May 23rd by dastardly midnight marauders. The Le M.U.R. association, which manages the three by eight metre billboad set aside by the city council for the purpose of promoting street art, where Rue Oberkampf meets Rue Saint Maur in the 11th Arrondissement, invited the French street artist also known as LMDLDZR to create a temporary artwork to fill the artistic void.

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (9)

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (7)

At One in the morning, the anonymous LMDLDZR started work on his  figurative and abstract graphic-style design, using just black marker pens, managing to fill the white panelled wall in just two hours. He signed the work with a QR code also drawn in his motif pattern style.

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (5)

The artist is known for his ‘Tic Tac Toe’ street campaign, which can be seen all over Paris, and soon, on walls in New York and London the artist recently revealed to Street Art Paris over a stealthily supped espresso.

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (1)

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (3)

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (4)

The Le M.U.R. Project billboard usually changes every two weeks although this time the gap was a little shorter.  To find out a little more about Le M.U.R. please check out our previous post which covered VHILS’ work.  We will be regularly covering developments at Le MUR so check back soon to stay updated.   Below is another great piece by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR:

VHILS Paris street art at Le M.U.R. Stolen & replaced with work by Le MoDuLe De ZeeR – Alternative Paris. Photo: Demian Smith (2)

Photos of Le M.U.R. and additional information by Maria Fernanda Hinke Schweichler at MyLifeOnMyBike blog.

This interview was originally published on the website, Street Art Paris.

Vhils, aka Alexandre Farto, hits Le MUR in Oberkampf

Vhils aka Alexandre Farto Paris street art at Le MUR, Oberkampf - Alternative Paris - Photo: Demian Smith (1)

Yesterday, Portuguese street artist VHILS, aka Alexandre Farto, hit ‘Le M.U.R.’ (Association Modulable, Urbain, Réactif), where Rue Oberkampf meets Rue Saint Maur in the 11th Arrondissement.

Vhils aka Alexandre Farto Paris street art at Le MUR, Oberkampf - Alternative Paris - Photo: Demian Smith (2)

Vhils aka Alexandre Farto Paris street art at Le MUR, Oberkampf - Alternative Paris - Photo: Demian Smith (3)

Vhils aka Alexandre Farto Paris street art at Le MUR, Oberkampf - Alternative Paris - Photo: Demian Smith (4)

The Le M.U.R. Project revolves around a three by eight metre billboad set aside by the city council for the purpose of promoting street art by presenting a different artist the opportunity to get up on the billboard every two weeks. Each time, the old artwork is covered by mash up of advertising posters and the latest artist is invited to put up their piece. The Le M.U.R. association was conceived in 2003 by Jean Faucheur and has been getting work up on the billboard consistently since 2007. A perusal of the Le MUR website reveals the staggering number of artists that have participated in this project and allows you to see the different incarnations of the billboard.

VHILS himself works with a variety of media but is probably best known for the relief portraits that he chisels into plaster and brick walls all over the world and in places as far flung as Shanghai, China. However, he is also at home creating portraits out of collage and wheat paste when the opportunity to attack the wall itself does not arise.

We, at Alternative Paris, intend to cover Le MUR regularly so please check back in two weeks time for details of the latest piece …

This article was originally published on the website, Street Art Paris.